Empowering Indigenous Economic Development and Entrepreneurship

Empowering Indigenous Economic Development and Entrepreneurship : 107 Project, 107 Redfern Street. Naidoc Week. Matthew Tukaki from Entrehub introduced the panel Te Ururoa Flavell from Maori Party, Professor John Hewson, Noreen Young from PWC Indigenous Business and Laura Berry from Supply Nation. The panel members were gracious with their time and open with their commitment to improving the Indigenous nation through economic initiatives. The conversation was deep, meaningful and needs to continue for it to move forward and be of value.

Powerful Business messages from a cultural perspective

The second in our Business Breakfast Seminar Series was another AWESOME EVENT. Our speakers conversations were fantastic, interesting and informative. A very special thanks to Aunty Margaret, someone that everyone needs to hear from, she has so much to offer; articulate, authoritative and powerful. Each speaker had their own particular list of qualities to add to our special event. Thanks to everyone that enhanced our beautiful day.

Dunghutti & Djerrinja woman Aunty Margret Campbell to present at breakfast seminar

The Maori Business Network Breakfast Seminar is proud to announce that Aunty Margret Campbell will be presenting this Saturday the 22nd of November
Margret Campbell is known and accepted as being a Dunghutti & Djerrinja woman whose families relocated to EORA Country(Sydney) in 1958. Margret’s contributions in building the modern EORA capacity over the past 50years is an immeasurable asset. In 1978 she was a founding member of the most notable community based education service – the NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group holding the committee position of Vice President 1980-85. Margret’s positive can do attitude and skill capability is grounded in a willingness to share her cultural knowledge. In 2014, Margret is a successful business owner managing DreamTime Southern X growing jobs in cultural tourism and downunder heritage. She is also a current Board Member of the Wyanga Aboriginal Aged Care Programs in Redfern - Cadigal Country.

MEDIA RELEASE - Future Maori film-makers shine

MEDIA RELEASE

Thursday 28 August 2014, 9:21am
Bethune Communications

Future Maori film-makers shine – Aotearoa Maori Film Festival Sydney and Brisbane 2014

This year’s Aotearoa Maori film festival screened last weekend in Sydney and showcased a new film workshop for tamariki (children). Although, only in its second year the festival has a unique market and heads to Brisbane 5, 6 September.

New Zealand organiser of the film festival Brent Reihana says, “We’re show-casing our Maori talent in film-making and also growing the potential talent of our tamariki through these creative film workshops.”

Enthusiastic youth participated in the 1-day workshop and learned more about Tikanga Maori and how it weaves in to making films. Participants were also taught skills in how to develop a creative concept, and how to tell a Maori story through whakatauaki (Maori proverb) plus hands on activities including how to use a digital app. Audience members had the honour of seeing the finished work on screen as part of the film festival.

Mr Reihana says, “Our aim is to build an audience for Maori films in three locations – Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. To achieve this ambitious goal Brent and his film festival team need bums on seats. He admits, “Our priority is to sell tickets and make enough money to sustain the festival.”

TemaKwan Fenton an experienced Maori film-maker now based in Sydney inspires the tamariki
film-makers of tomorrow by sharing her knowledge. She says, “The workshop builds confidence and the kids are really inspired to unleash their creative potential.” Qualified teachers also helped to design and teach the programme.

The festival mainly screens short films both traditional and contemporary including Te Reo Maori across all genres. In the future Mr Reihana hopes to include documentaries and feature films to offer a broader range of films to an audience.

The 2014 Aotearoa Maori film festival saw the international debut of New Zealand’s first 3D Maori animated short film THE RANGIMOEKAUS and also the Cannes festival film Home by Api Ipo and Butterfly directed by Renae Maihi – this film depicts the sensitive subject of unwanted teen pregnancy and it is told in a haunting way through poi that is also quite tragically beautiful.

Mr Reihana, a businessman and management consultant at Mantra Solutions in Sydney says one of the biggest challenges is funding the festival.

“We’d love some support from Maori and Kiwis living in New Zealand  – you can purchase a ticket to the Brisbane screening or make a donation by visiting our website.”

The festival has support from the esteemed Wairoa Maori Film Festival in New Zealand and opportunities to grow through community partnerships and sponsorship. Building relationships with local ethnic communities and lovers of indigenous films will attract interest in the film festival.

The festival also passes down knowledge to the next generations of Maori - Ka put e ruha, ka te rangatahi - As an old net withers another is remade. When an elder is no longer fit to lead, a healthier leader will stand in his place.

The Aotearoa Maori Film Festival heads to Brisbane 5, 6 September. To support the festival contact Brent Reihana or visit www.aotearoamaorifilmfestival.com

For all media enquiries contact Brent Reihana (Australia +61  417 686 141)

Helena Bethune (New Zealand +61  021 176 1495)
 

ENDS

Business leader calls for the freeing up of capital held in NZ owned Australian superannuation accounts.

New Zealand born, and Australian based, businessman Matthew Tukaki will tonight tell a gathering of kiwi expats and business leaders in Sydney that one way to keep the New Zealand economy growing would be to support more growth in the small business and start-ups sectors. Mr Tukaki is the former Head of Drake International, Chair of Social Investment business Sustain Group and Co-Founder of the EntreHub.org (a movement with more than 34,000 members focussed on entrepreneurship across 81 countries) and is speaking at the World Class New Zealand event being hosted by Google Australia and Kea New Zealand: “The feedback that I get from many people, irrespective of the country where they are located, is that access to capital is a major problem. People with great ideas are often left to cash flow the business start-up with nothing other than personal savings because of bank loan criteria. But, New Zealanders living in Australia (or who have returned home) have something that many other countries don’t have which is tens of millions and hundreds of millions of dollars sitting in Australian based superannuation funds.” “The prospective law changes back in 2012 only dealt with the portability of funds and the principles were designed to protect the integrity of the Australian scheme – meantime as the Australian scheme grows in age and many New Zealanders make the move back to New Zealand they do so by forgetting just how much money is sitting in forgotten accounts.” “In my view we should take another look at the scheme to free up some of the money that does return to New Zealand to be able to be used for capital to fund a business start-up because let’s face it if kiwi’s come home and have access to capital then not only could they start their own business and become self-employed they will begin creating opportunities for others – employing others.” Mr Tukaki said that there are still tax considerations to be made but the imperative should be that those who return are able to access funds to create their own support through business start-up or investment as opposed to becoming reliant on others “in particular the State.” Mr Tukaki also focussed his attention on Maori economic development: “One of the additional key considerations is how this approach could work for Maori and frame Maori economic development into the future. According to the 2011 census there were 128,430 Maori living in Australia and we all know that over time many do in fact return home. When they return they often bring a lot more than when they left such as skills, qualifications, experience and you guessed it – capital. However, if capital was off the table why couldn’t they be able to access superannuation held in Australia for the same purpose? If Maori can return home and start a business then we know, anecdotally, that they often employ other Maori through friends and family networks.” www.entrehub.org I @entrehub.org A million stories and counting “There are a range of ways that criteria can be developed for access such as the need to complete a vetted business plan and cash flow forecasts and it could be possible to suggest that the capital amount able to be accessed is only a percentage of the total value of the fund – this would make it easier to mitigate risk of failure by retaining a core amount of the principle.” “It would be great to see us talk more about not only how we can attract talented kiwi’s back to New Zealand but also allowing them to bring the funds necessary to drive small business and entrepreneurial growth.” Press release ends:  About Matthew Tukaki: Matthew is Co-Founder of both Sustain Group and EntreHub.org is the current Chair of Deakin University CSaRO, Chair of the joint initiative between the US National Science Foundation and Sydney University (BESERG) as well as a Director of the Boards of a number of public and private institutions. He served as Australia’s Representative to the United Nations Global Compact from 2010-13 and was appointed by the UN Secretary General to the Board of the UNGC in May of 2013.  About the event tonight: part of the Kew New Zealand, World Class New Zealand “Inspire Series” being hosted at Google Australia’s Headquarters and being attended by more than 80 New Zealand business people and influencers  For comment: Matthew Tukaki @ +61 2 415 093 137 or email lpecov@entrehub.org

New Zealand born, and Australian based, businessman Matthew Tukaki will tonight tell a gathering of kiwi expats and business leaders in Sydney that one way to keep the New Zealand economy growing would be to support more growth in the small business and start-ups sectors. Mr Tukaki is the former Head of Drake International, Chair of Social Investment business Sustain Group and Co-Founder of the EntreHub.org (a movement with more than 34,000 members focussed on entrepreneurship across 81 countries) and is speaking at the World Class New Zealand event being hosted by Google Australia and Kea New Zealand:
“The feedback that I get from many people, irrespective of the country where they are located, is that access to capital is a major problem. People with great ideas are often left to cash flow the business start-up with nothing other than personal savings because of bank loan criteria. But, New Zealanders living in Australia (or who have returned home) have something that many other countries don’t have which is tens of millions and hundreds of millions of dollars sitting in Australian based superannuation funds.”
“The prospective law changes back in 2012 only dealt with the portability of funds and the principles were designed to protect the integrity of the Australian scheme – meantime as the Australian scheme grows in age and many New Zealanders make the move back to New Zealand they do so by forgetting just how much money is sitting in forgotten accounts.”
“In my view we should take another look at the scheme to free up some of the money that does return to New Zealand to be able to be used for capital to fund a business start-up because let’s face it if kiwi’s come home and have access to capital then not only could they start their own business and become self-employed they will begin creating opportunities for others – employing others.”
Mr Tukaki said that there are still tax considerations to be made but the imperative should be that those who return are able to access funds to create their own support through business start-up or investment as opposed to becoming reliant on others “in particular the State.” Mr Tukaki also focussed his attention on Maori economic development:
“One of the additional key considerations is how this approach could work for Maori and frame Maori economic development into the future. According to the 2011 census there were 128,430 Maori living in Australia and we all know that over time many do in fact return home. When they return they often bring a lot more than when they left such as skills, qualifications, experience and you guessed it – capital. However, if capital was off the table why couldn’t they be able to access superannuation held in Australia for the same purpose? If Maori can return home and start a business then we know, anecdotally, that they often employ other Maori through friends and family networks.”
www.entrehub.org I @entrehub.org
A million stories and counting
“There are a range of ways that criteria can be developed for access such as the need to complete a vetted business plan and cash flow forecasts and it could be possible to suggest that the capital amount able to be accessed is only a percentage of the total value of the fund – this would make it easier to mitigate risk of failure by retaining a core amount of the principle.”
“It would be great to see us talk more about not only how we can attract talented kiwi’s back to New Zealand but also allowing them to bring the funds necessary to drive small business and entrepreneurial growth.”
Press release ends:
 About Matthew Tukaki: Matthew is Co-Founder of both Sustain Group and EntreHub.org is the current Chair of Deakin University CSaRO, Chair of the joint initiative between the US National Science Foundation and Sydney University (BESERG) as well as a Director of the Boards of a number of public and private institutions. He served as Australia’s Representative to the United Nations Global Compact from 2010-13 and was appointed by the UN Secretary General to the Board of the UNGC in May of 2013.
 About the event tonight: part of the Kew New Zealand, World Class New Zealand “Inspire Series” being hosted at Google Australia’s Headquarters and being attended by more than 80 New Zealand business people and influencers
 For comment: Matthew Tukaki @ +61 2 415 093 137 or email lpecov@entrehub.org

Maori Business Network host breakfast at Matariki

Kia ora tatou,

A warm and heartfelt "thank you" to everyone that supported and came along to our Matariki Breafast. O'Gradys' catering were fantastic in looking after our kai and as usual everyone was well looked after.

It would have been difficult to tell participants that they would be giving up their (early) Saturday morning to listen to a talk about insurance (and still expect them to come or at least be enthusiastic about coming along) - so we didn't tell them BUT watching and listening to Adrian Johns from Coverforce talk about what he does and why, was pretty cool. Adrian educated us about what insurance is, what it covers and why you have it - it sounds simple...and it is but we need to hear it and understand it for it to make sense so that we're comfortable with it. Adrians presentation was honest (he called insurance the industry of doom & gloom) and it was to the point and when questions were thrown at him he didn't become a politician and delay, deny or defuse the question. It was clearly laid out that; what you do, where you do it and who you do it with are the issues that insurance people focus on when drawing up and costing cover plans. i think we all learned a bit and now have someone that we can talk to about insurance.

Devlin Tikitiki talked about his life and work experiences (and wow!!@! who can do all of that?). How many different countries and roles can one person be involved in during one lifetime?? His involvement in the Maori community spans locations and roles within a range of organizations that deliver real and meaningful value to adults and children in the Maori community. Teaching and hospitality are industries that Devlin draws his experiences from and as he teaches my kids at kohanga hopefully this will infuse itself into their little beings. With the Aotearoa Maori Film Festival he is delivering film skills (alongside Tema and others) to our tamariki so that they can become skilled at shooting and editing a short clip for the internet. Devlin announced that the Aotearoa Maori Film Festival will be taken up to Logan, Brisbane for Friday the 5th and 6th of September 2014.

Last but not least was Mathew Tukutaki from Entrehub, Mathew had only just made it out of hospital to come and share his experiences with us. As and advocate and endorser of disruption, he knows that disruption brings calm. Statistical data would then follow that if there's more disruption and that if calm naturally follows disruption then the more disruption the more calm we have in our lives. Mathew spoke about the disruptive emphasis that he encouraged businesses to involve themselves in in order to bring about positive change. The learnings that are relevant today were absolute gems for our breakfast party to take in especially if they caused him to get to the top of organizations and turn them around. What Mathew is involving himself in now with entrehub only just kept everyone from falling off the edge of their seats. To know that we can leverage ourselves off entrehub is an absolute gift.

Kotahi Tours donated two Sydney walking tours as one of the door prizes and after breakfast I overheard both winners locking in times that they could both go on the tour. After taking the tour my view is that every Maori living in Sydney must take the tour given the whakapapa that they are now connects them to Poihakena.

Mana Sports donated an outfit (compression wear) that Irihapeti was already making arrangements to pick on that same day up from John Williams from Mana Sports. Possibly given Mathews very recent stay at the hospital it would be a good idea to think about purchasing some gear to go running in.

Aotearoa Maori Film Festival donated a free double pass to one of the screenings in Sydney. They were hoping that since Devlin had only just announced Logan they may consider going up to Brisbane to take us up on the offer.

I don't really want to go into the breakfast any further BUT if you want to know more, you should talk to one of the attendees today. If you weren't here today - you should have been. To all of those members that said they wanted to be here -  i had a great time and honestly you should have been here. See you at the next event.

Heoi ano,

Brent Reihana

Poihakena Tours : Stories of Maori in Sydney - TRIPADVISOR REVIEW

http://www.tripadvisor.com.au/Attraction_Review-g255060-d6681856-Reviews-Kotahi_Tourism_Private_Tours-Sydney_New_South_Wales.html

http://www.tripadvisor.com.au/Attraction_Review-g255060-d6681856-Reviews-Kotahi_Tourism_Private_Tours-Sydney_New_South_Wales.html

 

This is what Aussie bloke Rohan from Gosford had to say after taking the Poihakena Tour...

"Kotahi Tourism promises 'meaningful experiences' on their website, and the Poihakena Tour certainly provides that. The tour consists of a two hour guided walking tour of The Rocks, interwoven with stories of Maori in Sydney. These stories cover the period from 1793 to the present , but have a strong emphasis on the pre-1840 era. Even for those familiar with Sydney's Maori history, these stories are told with a passion that brings them to life. I would highly recommend the Poihakena Tour to both locals and visitors to Sydney who want to see a different side of the city and understand its past a little better. The walking part of the tour is not strenuous and would be suitable for most fitness levels, though being The Rocks there are a lot of stairs to navigate. I would definitely recommend this tour as a cost-effective way to see a wonderful part of Sydney, better understand Australia's complex history, and enjoy a meaningful tourist experience."

Visited July 2014